Research

Qpercom’s OSCE Management Information System (OMIS) generates a wide range of statistical analysis and assessment data which many academics have used in their research. From our home base of the National University of Ireland, Galway, we are writing papers which cover areas such as communication skills, exam reliability and innovative approaches to assessment. Here is a selection of linked articles which have been produced by Dr Thomas Kropmans and Winny Setyonugroho referring to data collected within OMIS.

 

 

Setyonugroho, W & Kropmans, T (June 2015) Reliability and validity of OSCE checklists used to assess communication skills of undergraduate medical students: A Systematic Review. Patient Education and Counseling

Abstract: Background assessment of communication skills (CS) is an integral component of modern undergraduate medical student assessment in Irish medical curricula. The authors systematically reviewed the literature pertaining to the use of Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs) to assess CS. The aim of the study was to explore inter-rater agreement between reviewers comparing reliability and validity of checklist forms that claim to assess the communication skills of undergraduate medical students in OSCEs.

 

Meskell, P & Kropmans, T (June 2015) Back to the Future: An Online OSCE Management Information System for Nursing OSCEs. Nurse Education Today

Abstract: The Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) is an established tool in the repertoire of clinical assessment methods in nurse education. The use of OSCEs facilitates the assessment of psychomotor skills as well as knowledge and attitudes. Identified benefits of OSCE assessment include development of students’ confidence in their clinical skills and preparation for clinical practice. However, a number of challenges exist with the traditional paper methodology, including documentation errors and inadequate student feedback. To explore electronic OSCE delivery and evaluate the benefits of using an electronic OSCE management system as well as assessors’ perceptions of and attitudes to the computer based package, this study was conducted using electronic software in the management of a four station OSCE assessment with a cohort of first year undergraduate nursing students delivered over two consecutive years (n = 203) in one higher education institution in Ireland.

 

Kropmans, T (February 2015) Back to the Future: Electronic Marking Using an Online Management Information System in Schools of Health Sciences. Journal of Health & Medical Informatics

Abstract: The Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) and Multi Mini Interviews (MMI) are established tools in the repertoire of clinical assessment methods in Schools of Medicine and Health Sciences worldwide. The use of OSCEs facilitates the assessment of psychomotor skills as well as knowledge and attitudes. Identified benefits of OSCE assessment include development of students’ confidence in their clinical skills and preparation for clinical practice. However, a number of challenges exist with the traditional paper methodology, including documentation errors and inadequate student feedback, electronic assessment is therefore new future. Objectives: To explore electronic OSCE delivery and evaluate the benefits of using an electronic OSCE management system.

 

Kropmans, T (2015) Back to the Future: Electronic Marking Using an Online Management Information System. Journal of Medical Students, Galway Vol 2

Abstract: The Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) is an established tool in the repertoire of clinical assessment methods in Schools of Medicine worldwide. Identified benefits of OSCE assessment include development of students’ confidence in their clinical skills and preparation for clinical practice. However, a number of challenges exist with the traditional paper methodology. To explore electronic OSCE delivery and evaluate the benefits of using an electronic OSCE management system, a pilot study was conducted using electronic software in the management of a four station OSCE assessment with a cohort of first year undergraduate medical students delivered over two consecutive years (n=383) in one higher education institution in Ireland.

 

Kropmans, T (2014) Research in Medical Education. Research Matters Vol 9

Abstract: Physicians’ communication skills have a considerable impact upon quality of health care. Good communication skills improve healthcare outcomes, such as physiological status, pain control, and emotional health. Furthermore, good communication skills significantly increase patient understanding and patient satisfaction.

 

Kropmans, T (January 2012) An Online Management Information System for Objective Structured Clinical Examinations. Computer and Information Science 

Abstract: Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCE) are adopted for high stakes assessment in medical education. Students pass through a series of timed stations demonstrating specific skills. Examiners observe and rate students using predetermined criteria. In most OSCEs low level technology is used to capture, analyse and produce results. We describe an OSCE Management Information System (OMIS) to streamline the OSCE process and improve quality assurance. OMIS captured OSCE data in real time using a Web 2.0 platform. We compared the traditional paper trail outcome with detailed real time analyses of separate stations.


Publishing Pending:

 

Setyonugroho, W & Kropmans, T (Accepted) Calibration of Communication Skills items according to the MAAS-GLOBAL in Objective Structured Clinical Examinations: a pilot study

Abstract: The aim of this study is to explore whether or not it is possible to reliably calibrate existing OSCE station checklists according to the Maas-Global, a measurement instrument originating from Maastricht University. Three raters independently compared all existing station checklist items with the 17 items checklist of the Maas-Global. Four different departments (i.e. Obstetrics & Gynaecology, Paediatrics, Psychiatry, and General Practice) contribute to this assessment. We used an online OSCE Management Information System (OMIS) for data retrieval and analysis. The reliability of the calibration procedure was analyzed using Generalizability Theory of data from four recent academic terms.

A full list of Dr Kropmans’ published work can be viewed on his personal LinkedIn page here.